Brands Capitalize on Election Year

When a hot topic consumes the public, it brings forth a host of opinions, debates, publicity, and interest. It’s all everyone talks about–or so it seems. Election years bring nonstop conversations and media attention. Few people escape election years without being bombarded with advertisements, commentary, or discussions about an upcoming election. Therefore, brands that integrate their way into everyday discussions can create more exposure.

Election years can stifle company advertisements as candidates flood media outlets in the pursuit of gaining supporters. However, election years can elicit new ways for brands to create recognition–as long as they tread lightly. Brands must be careful that their message doesn’t appear to take sides. They have to be creative enough to incorporate an election theme, but appear unbiased in the process. Some brands are doing just that.

Chrysler is using two actors who played presidential roles, one in a TV series and another in a movie, to promote two of its new vehicles. Hotels.com takes a light approach with its Captain Obvious mascot running for president. The advertising storyline takes the mascot to all 50 states in a series of commercials. Pop-Tarts is heading a Pop the Vote campaign. JetBlue launched its “Reach Across the Aisle” ad, showcasing how compromise can help reach resolutions, using rows of red and blue that represent political parties. These are just a few examples of clever ways brands are capitalizing on the election.

By using a topic that is at the forefront of consumer minds, these brands resonate with consumers. Election years bring tense competition and nonstop messages. Consumers may find it refreshing to address such topics in a lighter tone. Brands that bravely tackle such hot topics could reap the rewards.